Elementary School‎ > ‎First Grade‎ > ‎Mrs. Walls‎ > ‎

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog


Mrs. Walls Math Blog (Week of 5.20.19)

posted May 17, 2019, 12:18 PM by Melanie Walls

Our last two days of Math for the school year will be on Monday and Tuesday of this week.  We will wrap up the school year by completing a spiral review of the entire school year and taking an end of year Math assessment to aid in next year's math placements.

On Wednesday, your child will be bringing home their white weekly folder.  Inside of their white folder you will find their purple homework folder.  Within the homework folder will be an additional chapter in the math curriculum titled Getting Ready for 3rd Grade GO Math!  I highly recommend your child complete these lessons at home over the summer so they are well prepared for next school year.

I am so proud of all the hard work your students put in over the school year.  I feel confident they will continue to be successful in 2nd grade!

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 5.13.19)

posted May 10, 2019, 11:07 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 5.13.19)

We will finish Chapter 11: Geometry and Fraction Concepts.  In this chapter, students will learn about three-dimensional and two-dimensional shapes.  They will also learn about equal parts of a whole.

Lessons this week include identifying and naming equal parts of circles and rectangles as halves, thirds, or fourths, partitioning shapes to show halves, thirds, or fourths, identifying and describing one equal part as a half of, a third of, or a fourth of a whole, and solving problems involving wholes divided into equal shares by using the strategy draw a diagram.

Students will take their Chapter 11 Test on Friday, May 17.

Why teach this?
It is important for children to build a conceptual foundation about fractions so they can be prepared to use fractions in later grades.  Children will apply their knowledge of equal parts as they divide a whole into equal parts of halves, thirds, and fourths.

Chapter 11 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • angle- a shape formed by two line segments that share the same endpoint
  • cone- a three-dimensional shape with a circular base and a point at the top
  • cube- a three-dimensional shape with six square faces
  • cylinder- a three-dimensional shape with two circular parallel bases and a curved surface
  • edge- where two faces of a three-dimensional shape meet
  • face- a polygon that is a flat surface of a three-dimensional shape
  • fourths- four equal parts
  • halves- two equal parts
  • hexagon- a polygon with six sides
  • pentagon- a polygon with five sides
  • quadrilateral- a polygon with four sides
  • rectangular prism- a three-dimensional shape with six faces that are rectangles
  • side- one of the line segments that forms a polygon
  • thirds- three equal parts
  • vertex- the point where 2 sides of a polygon meet or 3 or more edges of a three-dimensional shape meet
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, May 19.  

Monday- Lesson 11.8 Homework and OPTIONAL Chapter 11 Practice Test
Tuesday- Lesson 11.9 Homework 
Wednesday- Lesson 11.10 Homework 
Thursday- Lesson 11.11 Homework 
Friday- No homework

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 5.6.19)

posted May 3, 2019, 6:18 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 5.6.19)

We will continue Chapter 11: Geometry and Fraction Concepts.  In this chapter, students will learn about three-dimensional and two-dimensional shapes.  They will also learn about equal parts of a whole.

Lessons this week include sorting two-dimensional shapes according to their attributes, and partitioning rectangles into equal-size squares and finding the total number of these squares.

Why teach this?
From buildings and bridges to bicycles and buttons, the objects around us are the result of people using geometry.  The attributes of different shapes that make up an object often have a specific purpose.  For example, the sides and the angles of objects are often a particular length for a reason.

Chapter 11 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • angle- a shape formed by two line segments that share the same endpoint
  • cone- a three-dimensional shape with a circular base and a point at the top
  • cube- a three-dimensional shape with six square faces
  • cylinder- a three-dimensional shape with two circular parallel bases and a curved surface
  • edge- where two faces of a three-dimensional shape meet
  • face- a polygon that is a flat surface of a three-dimensional shape
  • fourths- four equal parts
  • halves- two equal parts
  • hexagon- a polygon with six sides
  • pentagon- a polygon with five sides
  • quadrilateral- a polygon with four sides
  • rectangular prism- a three-dimensional shape with six faces that are rectangles
  • side- one of the line segments that forms a polygon
  • thirds- three equal parts
  • vertex- the point where 2 sides of a polygon meet or 3 or more edges of a three-dimensional shape meet
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, May 12.  

Monday- Lesson 11.6 Homework
Tuesday- Lesson 11.7 Homework 
Wednesday- No homework
Thursday- No homework
Friday- No homework

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.29.19)

posted Apr 26, 2019, 6:17 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.29.19)

We will begin Chapter 11: Geometry and Fraction Concepts.  In this chapter, students will learn about three-dimensional and two-dimensional shapes.  They will also learn about equal parts of a whole.

Lessons this week include identifying three-dimensional shapes, identifying and describing three-dimensional shapes according to the number of faces, edges, and vertices, building three-dimensional shapes using cubes and other objects, naming 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-sided shapes according to the number of sides and vertices, and identifying angles in two-dimensional shapes.

Why teach this?
A tally chart provides an efficient way to record data collected in a survey.  One tally mark is made in the chart for each response given in the survey.  There is, therefore, a one-to-one correspondence between responses and tally marks.  Every fifth tally mark is made as a diagonal mark over the four preceding marks.  This convention makes it easier to count by fives instead of ones to find a total.  Children use a variety of skills as they read and interpret data in a picture graph.  THey must first be able to read and understand the elements of a picture graph: the title, the categories, the key, and the pictures indicating the data contained in the graph.  Once children understand how to read a picture graph, they will then be able to find and use information in the graph to answer questions and solve problems.  Children will solve problems involving addition and subtraction.  In this chapter, the keys for the picture graphs are limited to pictures that represent one unit.  THe use of a key builds a foundation for using keys in which each picture represents multiple units, which are taught in later grades.

Chapter 11 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • angle- a shape formed by two line segments that share the same endpoint
  • cone- a three-dimensional shape with a circular base and a point at the top
  • cube- a three-dimensional shape with six square faces
  • cylinder- a three-dimensional shape with two circular parallel bases and a curved surface
  • edge- where two faces of a three-dimensional shape meet
  • face- a polygon that is a flat surface of a three-dimensional shape
  • fourths- four equal parts
  • halves- two equal parts
  • hexagon- a polygon with six sides
  • pentagon- a polygon with five sides
  • quadrilateral- a polygon with four sides
  • rectangular prism- a three-dimensional shape with six faces that are rectangles
  • side- one of the line segments that forms a polygon
  • thirds- three equal parts
  • vertex- the point where 2 sides of a polygon meet or 3 or more edges of a three-dimensional shape meet
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, May 5.  

Monday- Lesson 11.1 Homework
Tuesday- Lesson 11.2 Homework 
Wednesday- Lesson 11.3 Homework
Thursday- Lesson 11.4 Homework
Friday- Lesson 11.5 Homework Homework OPTIONAL

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.22.19)

posted Apr 19, 2019, 6:28 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.22.19)

We will begin Chapter 10: Data.  In this chapter, students will learn about collecting data, making graphs, and interpreting the data.  This chapter is very short and skills are typically grasped by students quickly and easily.  Therefore, we will be starting and finishing the chapter within the week.

Lessons this week include collecting data in a survey and record that data in a tally chart, interpreting data in picture graphs and use that information to solve problems, making picture graphs to represent data, interpreting data in bar graphs and using the information to solve problems, making bar graphs to represent data, and solving problems involving data by using the strategy make a graph.

Students will be taking their Mid-Chapter Checkpoint on Wednesday, April 24.  They will be taking their Chapter 10 Test on Monday, April 29.

Why teach this?
A tally chart provides an efficient way to record data collected in a survey.  One tally mark is made in the chart for each response given in the survey.  There is, therefore, a one-to-one correspondence between responses and tally marks.  Every fifth tally mark is made as a diagonal mark over the four preceding marks.  This convention makes it easier to count by fives instead of ones to find a total.  Children use a variety of skills as they read and interpret data in a picture graph.  THey must first be able to read and understand the elements of a picture graph: the title, the categories, the key, and the pictures indicating the data contained in the graph.  Once children understand how to read a picture graph, they will then be able to find and use information in the graph to answer questions and solve problems.  Children will solve problems involving addition and subtraction.  In this chapter, the keys for the picture graphs are limited to pictures that represent one unit.  THe use of a key builds a foundation for using keys in which each picture represents multiple units, which are taught in later grades.

Chapter 10 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • bar graph- a graph that uses bars to show data
  • data- information collected about people or things
  • key- a key for a picture graph tells the number that each picture or symbol represents
  • picture graph- a graph that uses pictures to show data
  • survey- a method of gathering information
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, April 28.  

Monday- Lesson 10.1 Homework
Tuesday- Lesson 10.2 and 10.3 Homework 
Wednesday- Lesson 10.4 Homework
Thursday- Lesson 10.5 and 10.6 Homework
Friday- No homework

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.15.19)

posted Apr 12, 2019, 7:06 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.15.19)

We will finish Chapter 9: Length in Metric Units.  In this chapter, students will learn how to measure using centimeters and meters and also solve problems about adding and subtracting lengths.  

Lessons this week include measuring the lengths of objects in both centimeters and meters to explore the inverse relationship between size and number of units, estimating the lengths of objects in meters, and measuring and then finding the difference in the lengths of two objects.

Students will be taking their Chapter 9 Test on Thursday, April 18.

Why teach this?
To increase children's understanding of the measurement units centimeter and meter, give them opportunities to choose the most appropriate unit to use in various situations.  When choosing, children should consider the length to be measured and the level of precision needed.  When asking children to choose the best unit to use, you can connect this to the understanding of the inverse relationship between the size of a unit and the number of units used to measure a length.  For example, when measuring the length of a park or playground, the number of meters would be much less than the number of centimeters.  Although both units could be used to describe the length, it is more practical in this example to measure the length in meters.

Because the United States continues to use the customary system of measures, children may be more familiar with measuring and estimating lengths in inches and feet than in centimeters and meters.  The best way to help children become accustomed to measuring and estimating with units in the metric system is to provide many measuring experiences.

In second grade, children are beginning to relate units they may have heard about to actual distances.  They begin to use units units and iterations of units as benchmarks when estimating and for checking that an answer to a problem expressed in those units is reasonable.

Chapter 9 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • centimeter- a unit of length in the metric system of measurement
  • meter- a unit of length or distance in the metric system of measurement; 1 meter = 100 centimeters
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, April 21.  

Monday- Lesson 9.5 Homework and OPTIONAL Chapter 9 Practice Test
Tuesday- Lesson 9.6 Homework 
Wednesday- Lesson 9.7 Homework
Thursday- No homework
Friday- No homework

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.8.19)

posted Apr 5, 2019, 6:22 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.8.19)

We will begin Chapter 9: Length in Metric Units.  In this chapter, students will learn how to measure using centimeters and meters and also solve problems about adding and subtracting lengths.  

Lessons this week include using a concrete model to measure the lengths of objects in centimeters, estimating lengths of objects in centimeters by comparing them to known lengths, measuring lengths of objects to the nearest centimeter using a centimeter ruler, and solving problems involving adding and subtracting lengths by using the strategy draw a diagram.

Students will be taking their Mid-Chapter Checkpoint on Friday, April 12.

Why teach this?
Children have measured in inches and centimeters and have estimated the lengths of objects in inches.  Children will estimate the length of an object in centimeters, based on how it compares to another object for which the length is known.  Children will be shown two objects with different lengths.  The length of one of the objects is given.  Through direct comparison, children first determine whether the object with the unknown length is longer or shorter than the object with the known length.  Then, again using a direct comparison, children estimate how much longer or shorter the object with the unknown length is than the object with the known length.  In this way, children are able to reasonably estimate the whole length of the second object.

Chapter 9 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • centimeter- a unit of length in the metric system of measurement
  • meter- a unit of length or distance in the metric system of measurement; 1 meter = 100 centimeters
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, April 14.  

Monday- Lesson 9.1 Homework
Tuesday- Lesson 9.2 Homework 
Wednesday- Lesson 9.3 Homework
Thursday- Lesson 9.4 Homework
Friday- No homework

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.1.19)

posted Mar 22, 2019, 6:35 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 4.1.19)

We will finish Chapter 8: Length in Customary Units.  In this chapter, students will learn about inches and feet.  Students will also learn about measuring tools and showing measurement data.

Lessons this week include selecting appropriate tools for measuring different lengths and measuring the lengths of objects and using a line plot to display the measurement data.

Students will be taking their Chapter 8 Test on Friday, April 5.

Why teach this?
Choosing the appropriate measuring tool is an important skill children develop as they explore and measure the attributes of objects.  Children learn about different tools used to measure lengths of objects and distances in customary units.  In later grades, children will also learn about other measurement units and the tools used to measure them.  

Children will collect data by measuring the lengths of a group of like objects and then making a line plot to display this data.  Pictorial representations and graphs can be a useful way to compare multiple pieces of information.  Lien plots are beneficial to order and compare the data for different measurements or other types of information.  Children will learn about the different parts of a line plot, including a title, labels, and symbols for representing the data.

Chapter 8 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • foot- a unit of length in the customary system of measurement; 1 foot = 12 inches
  • inch- a unit of length in the customary system of measurement
  • line plot- a graph that records each piece of data on a number line
  • measuring tape- a tool that can be used to measure lengths and distances that are not flat or straight
  • yardstick- a tool that has marks to show three feet and can be used to measure lengths and distances greater than 12 inches
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, April 7.  

Monday- No homework
Tuesday- Lesson 8.8 Homework and OPTIONAL Chapter 8 Practice Test
Wednesday- Lesson 8.9 Homework
Thursday- No homework
Friday- No homework

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 3.18.19)

posted Mar 15, 2019, 9:52 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 3.18.19)

We will continue Chapter 8: Length in Customary Units.  In this chapter, students will learn about inches and feet.  Students will also learn about measuring tools and showing measurement data.

Lessons this week include solving addition and subtraction problems involving the lengths of objects by using the strategy draw a diagram, measuring the lengths of objects in both inches and feet to explore the inverse relationship between size and number of units, and estimating the lengths of objects in feet.

Students will be taking their Mid-Chapter Checkpoint Quiz on Tuesday, March 19.

Why teach this?
Children use the position of the hour hand and minute hand to tell time on an analog clock.  Reading an analog clock requires children to understand that the numbers are arranged in counting order.  As children's fluency in reading an analog clock increases, they will learn more about reading the positions of the hour hand and the minute hand.  Children will practice saying, showing, and writing the same time in different ways.  This practice reinforces children's understanding of how to read and tell time.  Children determine the correct position of the minute hand and then draw it on an analog clock for each of the times that are described in different ways.  This helps children connect descriptions of time to the positions of the clock hands.  It also helps them develop their understanding of how the spoken and written times are shown on an analog clock.  By writing time on a digital clock, children's understanding of how the hour and minute hands represent a specific time is reinforced.

Chapter 8 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • foot- a unit of length in the customary system of measurement; 1 foot = 12 inches
  • inch- a unit of length in the customary system of measurement
  • line plot- a graph that records each piece of data on a number line
  • measuring tape- a tool that can be used to measure lengths and distances that are not flat or straight
  • yardstick- a tool that has marks to show three feet and can be used to measure lengths and distances greater than 12 inches
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, March 24.  

Monday- Lesson 8.5 Homework 
Tuesday- No homework
Wednesday- Lesson 8.6 Homework
Thursday- No homework
Friday- Lesson 8.7 Homework OPTIONAL

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 3.11.19)

posted Mar 8, 2019, 6:57 AM by Melanie Walls

Mrs. Walls' Math Blog (Week of 3.11.19)

We will begin Chapter 8: Length in Customary Units.  In this chapter, students will learn about inches and feet.  Students will also learn about measuring tools and showing measurement data.

Lessons this week include using concrete models to measure the lengths of objects in inches, making an inch ruler and using it to measure the lengths of objects, estimating the lengths of objects by mentally partitioning the lengths into inches, and measuring the lengths of objects to the nearest inch using an inch ruler.

Why teach this?
Children use the position of the hour hand and minute hand to tell time on an analog clock.  Reading an analog clock requires children to understand that the numbers are arranged in counting order.  As children's fluency in reading an analog clock increases, they will learn more about reading the positions of the hour hand and the minute hand.  Children will practice saying, showing, and writing the same time in different ways.  This practice reinforces children's understanding of how to read and tell time.  Children determine the correct position of the minute hand and then draw it on an analog clock for each of the times that are described in different ways.  This helps children connect descriptions of time to the positions of the clock hands.  It also helps them develop their understanding of how the spoken and written times are shown on an analog clock.  By writing time on a digital clock, children's understanding of how the hour and minute hands represent a specific time is reinforced.

Chapter 8 Vocabulary-
For each chapter, I will be providing a list of important vocabulary words related to our in class learning.  Developing student's math language is a great way to improve their problem solving skills (think of complex word problems!).
  • foot- a unit of length in the customary system of measurement; 1 foot = 12 inches
  • inch- a unit of length in the customary system of measurement
  • line plot- a graph that records each piece of data on a number line
  • measuring tape- a tool that can be used to measure lengths and distances that are not flat or straight
  • yardstick- a tool that has marks to show three feet and can be used to measure lengths and distances greater than 12 inches
Homework-
All homework for this week is due on Sunday, March 17.  

Monday- Lesson 8.1 Homework 
Tuesday- Lesson 8.2 Homework
Wednesday- Lesson 8.3 Homework
Thursday- Lesson 8.4 Homework
Friday- No homework

1-10 of 100